Thursday, April 10, 2008

The $150k kitchen?



“The person who buys this kitchen isn’t polishing their own hardware,” said Mr. Peacock, stating the obvious. The Private Collection, he said, is an heirloom-quality room, with more detailing, hand-selected woods, those silver knobs, and a higher price, about 25 to 30 percent more than his other kitchens, he said, which on average, including the appliances and countertops he recommends, go for $185,000.

This is choice:

“My husband wanted a Christopher Peacock kitchen — period,” said Lisa Skinner. Her Scullery kitchen arrived in her new Greenwich home in September, she said, over the protests of her builder, who wanted to replicate a Peacock kitchen and promised to do so for less money.

Oh - you so know those people. They have to have the name and the looooove to tell you all about it. Vomit. These are people who say they love & collect Petrus and Caymus, but would fail if you blind tasted it against Cakebread or Mondavi or (maybe) 3 Buck Chuck.

You can read the whole article HERE.

40 comments:

ExpatInNZ said...

"A fool and his money..." At least the two kitchens featured are your (fairly) simple white cabinets & Carrera fare, not some Disney-fied faux-Tuscan McMansion nightmare.

Anonymous said...

I love my totally unreconstructed 1967-era kitchen. Totally ugly, totally comfortable. You can make a complete mess in it with no guilt, sit in it for hours drinking coffee, reading magazines, listening to the radio, etc.

S.HOPtalk said...

Funny...I tend to go in the complete opposite direction -the true thrill for me is in achieving the desired look WITHOUT the designer label or prices.

Jocelyn said...

i agree with shoptalk - i take a sort of sick pride in finding the stuff that looks expensive but isn't. Quality doesn't have to be a billion dollars. And taste is another thing entirely - which is why i read this blog!

Decorno said...

Well, beware Jocelyn. I can often be tasteless. :)

Just yesterday I was in a team meeting having an extensive conversation about guilty pleasure foods like the Hickory Farms Beef Stick (it's just fun to say) and Kraft Easy Cheese.

Now that I think about it, I kinda want that $150k kitchen just so I can stand near the marble-topped island shooting cheese in my mouth and chasing it with some Rolling Rock. Good times.

Anonymous said...

Would you have a Carrera Marble Vomitorium installed?

Decorno said...

YES. Yes, I would.

I was sad to learn just now that the kind of vomitorium we are hoping to construct was a myth:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vomitoria

(Because Wiki never lies.)

Anonymous said...

I hear Sub-Zero will be coming out with a stainless steel Vomitorium this fall.

Anonymous said...

There is an Oscar Wilde quote that goes something like "he knew the price of everything, and the value of nothing". Oscar pretty much sums it up.

An Aesthete's Lament said...

What can be said in favor of the CP kitchens is that they appear absolutely tasteful and inoffensive, rather handsome. And a better value than than a five-figure handbag covered in a company's logo, I say. But I just had a thought: If a house has a Peacock kitchen (given its price point and good name), it would put renovators on the sidelines ... who'd want to rip that out and go for granite and steel?

An Aesthete's Lament said...

FYI: The preceding comment is from someone, mind you, who has a 1950s Chambers stove, an IKEA cabinet, and some fugly refrigerator that I didn't want to buy because it was too unmentionably white and huge, but which was what Home Depot had on sale the day I desperately needed to buy a refrigerator. (I love my Chambers stove.)

Anonymous said...

Jimmy Choos, Birkin bags, Tiffany rings...

Anonymous said...

and the best part of all: No one cooks anymore!

LondonCalling said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Cote de Texas said...

Decorno - I love this! you are so funny!!!! I do agree with A.Lament though - if you can afford it, the C.P. kitchen is a gorgeous work of art. We're not talking cabinets that need tightening up after a few years. Or doors that start hanging a little low. Or drawers that don't glide open with the ease of an iceskater on new ice - we're talking first rate carpentry. I wish I had the money for one of these, but truthfully - even if I did I wouldn't buy one. I mean - who needs all that quality and perfection really? Certainly not that couple in the article probably whose description of yours is priceless. I do want the carrara counters though - all the way - white carrara marble with gorgeous black veining to go along with my oh so shit-tay cabintry!

Jules said...

These are the people I used to have as neighbors.

My kitchen cost $17,000, including appliances. Sure, that's not an accurate price since we ran out of money because I quit my job but it wouldn't have been much more. Top of the line kitchen? Nope, but I'm happy with it. I'll probably even love it once I put in a damn back splash, finish the trim, and put up window treatments.

Decorno said...

Joni - I love hearing this from you: "I mean - who needs all that quality and perfection really?" - - exactly!

After a certain point, too much perfection is alsmost... masturbatory. $150k on a kitchen? It's just so far past sensible.

Here's a question - - when will the "white kitchen" be out?

This guy got started delivering those faux-Frenchy kitchens with roosters and sponge-painted walls and all that crap. When will this "good taste" trend run out on us? Surely there must be another (far cooler) blog out there right now looking at subway tile, white cabinets, and marble counters saying "vomit" to this idea of good taste.

Maybe I should rethink my kitchen plans... :)

Anonymous said...

I love fine carpentry in furniture, but to tell you the truth, I don't care that much about it in a kitchen. My issues are storage space and counter space. And an atmosphere where I like to cook. If it's too white and shiny and pretty, I'd probably be too uncomfortable to whip up a batch of brownies or some other messy thing.

Anonymous said...

........How about the idiots/bores building these gems who PROUDLY/SMUGLY proclaim:
I don't cook.

Likely the same twits who dress for sport but DON'T PLAY.

BO-ring.
BO-ring.
BO-ring.

Jules said...

Anon--that's funny you say that. My friend is...well I don't know what it's called exactly, but she rides Olympic level Dressage. Every time jodhpurs and jodhpurs boots are in style she wants to scream.

Anonymous said...

Most American middle class families end up eating fancy takeout in these kitchens and the average American can barely boil water for Kraft shells 'n cheese. Marble is a horrible countertop material. It etches easily with acids like lemon juice and wine. It's great for rolling out pastry, but if you like the pristine marble look (not the french antique weathered marble look), then you have to be very careful what you put on it.
****************************
Also in some parts of the country $150K can buy a house. A new house, with several bedrooms.

Pigtown-Design said...

The funniest part was the next article. It was about a company that removes these trophy kitchens and then sells them.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/10/garden/10recycle.html?_r=1&ref=garden&oref=slogin

Anonymous said...

I just can't get past the phrase "Mr. Peacock."

Cote de Texas said...

Decorno - I will tell you this about carrara marble - over 30 years ago I was visiting my aunt who lived in the United Nations Apartment building where Johnny Carson lived (whoop ti do) - their bathrooms were all white carrara marble and gorgeous, small, simple, but gorgeous = classic and timeless, straight out of an English hotel. I've never gotten over those bathrooms. Will Carrara go out of fashion, sure, trends last about 10 years. Think about granite kitchens = vomit inducing. I want that white marble and I'm going to have it hopefully this year and I don't really care if it's "out" in a few years. But if you are worried about it, soapstone is pretty hot right now and its pretty gorgeous too and you'ld be on the upside of that trend. I say go for carrara if you love it as much as I do.

ExpatInNZ said...

Cote, We're in total agreement about the loveliness of soapstone. Kirkstone is another scrumptious option, deep gray-green and honed to matte perfection.

pve design said...

As my mother-in-law says, "having a kitchen like that would not make my food taste any better."
Hmm, I beg to differ, I could eat a classic grilled cheese in that kitchen any day and I think it would taste much better.

Linda Merrill said...

I'm with you Joni, carrara marble is timeless and classic. I think the fool and his money is the one who pays $150K for something trendy just for trend sake. Classic is where it's at. I'm currently doing a bathroom as you describe and I'm so excited for the end result.

As for the $150K kitchen, I guess it depends on the house it's in. If it's a $10M house, then yes, I'd expect a $150K kitchen. Just as one would expect the $500K house (average price in my area) to have at least a $30K kitchen. Of course, a beautiful kitchen can be done for less, but most people don't have the skills to do the labor themselves, which is where much of the cost is. And stock cabinetry/appliances are fine, but not in high end home. It would also be foolish to put $150K kitchen in a $500K house, you'd never get back the cost in a sale.

Anonymous said...

Old formica, old vinyl flooring. You can scrub the shit out of each and not worry about etching, hazing, buffing, sealing, yada yada yada...

j. said...

Reall great post! I'd been wondering when some naughty blogger would tear the lid off the everywhere, all the time, white on white, Carrera kitchen. Though I gotta admit it would probably be my choice (swoon) if I had the resources (which I most certainly do not), it has crossed my mind that this look will most certainly be 'out' in no time flat.

Decorno said...

"Just as one would expect the $500K house (average price in my area) to have at least a $30K kitchen."

Uh oh Linda... you won't be proud of me. Our house is worth more than that but we're doing only about a $6k upgrade on the place. Honestly, I would rather put the rest of the money into landscaping (or removing the wood rot behind our shower). I get more pleasure from hanging out in the backyard than I do from my kitchen.

But I see your point. In some lavish home, the cost of the kitchen should be relative to the cost of the whole place.

Joni - I am with you on marble. LOVE it. And I used to vomit on granite all the time until we saw a non-shiny kind (looks more like soapstone) that we really liked recently. I think any material can work if it looks right. I think granite gets gross when it's that super-shiny condo-looking BS. Ick.

What is the difference in cost between granite and marble?

Jules said...

Decorno--I have soapstone counter tops. Love them. I looked at the honed granite, too, but it just doesn't have the soft touch that soapstone has (it also doesn't have the veining, which is the best part about soapstone). Of course, that soft touch comes with problems (to some). It chips and scratches easily, and for the first year this is some up keep.

I personally don't mind the chips and scratches. In fact, I love them.

Before the market slump my house was worth more than $500k, too, but like I mentioned earlier, we spent about $17,000. Had our budget not collapsed, I think we would have spent around $20k. I had to put off a back splash and finding flooring at .20/ft.

Reggie said...

My personal favorite are the Clive Christian kitchen advertisements with vile, overwrought cabinetry and crystal chandalier(s). So grossly and expensively vulgar, no wonder they're regularly featured in Arch Di.

My kitchen? 1959 wooden cabinets painted white with Restoration Hardware pulls, Magic Chef stove. Just fine...for now.

Anonymous said...

Jules: Do you think the chips and scratches could pose hazards (places for bacteria from uncooked meat or vegetables to linger, etc.)?

I do like the slightly beat-up look you describe in the soapstone. Would hate the perfection of a new marble counter (esp. if white). I'm too much of a cooking slob.

Anonymous said...

Jules: Do you think the chips and scratches could pose hazards (places for bacteria from uncooked meat or vegetables to linger, etc.)?

I do like the slightly beat-up look you describe in the soapstone. Would hate the perfection of a new marble counter (esp. if white). I'm too much of a cooking slob.

visualvamp.blogspot.com/ said...

I think a story about $150. kitchen would be more interesting, at least for the pack of us mean girls.

Jules said...

Anon: I doubt it. The chips and scratches are only as deep as you are rough. Meaning, the most I have (after taking no care to be gentle in the last two years) are a few little nicks and scratches from where I, say, dropped a knife point down when I was unloading the dishwasher. AND, keep in mind that because soapstone is so soft you can also take fine sandpaper and buff out the scratch or ding if it bothers you too much. Then oil the spot until it catches up with the patina of the rest of your counter, or, forget about it like I do and let it catch up on it's own.

Anonymous said...

Jules:

I like your thinking!

Anonymous said...

"Disney-fied faux-Tuscan McMansion nightmare", omg I love, love, love! these posters.

.

Cote de Texas said...

Decorno = what you are describing is honed granite, which is granite, just not polished. It's a dull finish. There are some really pretty black granites that you could get honed, so they wouldn't be shiny but you get the advantages of the granite surface - granite is by far the best of the natural stone finishes as far as not scratching, staining, chipping, etc. So, if you want to go dark, honed granite would be a great option for you. (stick with white carrara hahah!! - j.k.) As far as price, I am shocked at how expensive the fake stone countertops are - as much if not more than the natural stones. Amazing. Even corian can rival some granites and marbles.

Anonymous said...

Tara needs to sew some of her now-famous Shirtless Cowboy pot-holders for Mr. Peacock.