Friday, July 4, 2008

We're all so individual! There is no one quite like me! My style matters!


"There was a period not long ago when a young, urban professional could maintain an apartment with a functional Pottery Barn sofa and walls painted in quiet neutrals and still be considered someone of reasonably good taste. Today he might well face criticism that he lacked imagination and soul, that he was a slave to an outdated aesthetic that sacrificed personal eccentricity to a collective right: the dream of demure, unsullied affluence.

A magazine like Domino implicitly tells us that chic spaces must project tension: between the old and the new, the generic and the particular. Good design is temerity, the brazen decision to put a chrome end table beside a Louis XVI chair, the submission to a life-size ceramic Labrador. Within these parameters you must always be sure that you are expressing you — the you who loves the Red Sox and Douglas Sirk and Tuscany in May."


Read it all HERE.

31 comments:

Anonymous said...

Note to self: Do not renew subscription to Domino.

Anonymous said...

That about sums it up.

maison21 said...

why wouldn't you want your home to express your individuality?

i'm so not seeing the problem here.

karina said...

I love that houses express individuality, the problem is that when your indiduality is no current fashion, mmm indiduality vs fashion mmm INDIDUALITY WINS!!!!!
If you are minimalist stay minimalist , I am an ecletic girl, I love minimalism but can not achieve it!

Decorno said...

M21 - I *totally* agree with you. I just worry that so many of us are like, "YES! A ceramic garden stool at Target!" and as we pick and choose from the same buffet, our idea of individuality starts to look so similar.

Anonymous said...

I like the way the article shows that Domino's insistence on "eclecticism" in fact produces just another plug-and-play decor trend:

"the brazen decision to put a chrome end table beside a Louis XVI chair"

(How many times have we seen that "ironic" juxtaposition?)

Anonymous said...

PS: Love that photo of the douchebag "Queer Guy" and his client. He has no idea how he comes off, does he?

I could picture him being brilliantly portrayed by Jon Lovitz.

Reggie said...

I think I just threw up in my mouth a little bit...

Anonymous said...

also overused:

"I think I just threw up in my mouth a little bit."

(Sorry Reggie, it's played out. How about "I just shot bile acid out my retinas a little"?)

s. said...

Suddenly, matchy-matchy unironic prettiness seems tremendously appealing. Everyone trying to be witty and graphic and interestinger-than-thou is merely tiresome.

Anonymous said...

Those might be the most annoying throw pillows I have ever seen.

karyn said...

Domino is still rad in my opinion, I don't have to do what they say, I can just look at and appreciate their style the same way that I would look at and appreciate the style of Traditional Home. Whatever. I don't get it. Do what you want.

couchseattle.com said...

If we keep talking about it Domino wins!

Lucky said...

Though it is obviously unreasonable to expect any individual reporter to have developed an understanding of the ever-changing panorama of cultural trends, I am surprised that the author of that article has not noticed that what Thom Filicia's new show is playing itself out everyday on much smaller scales-- design blogs. As someone already mentioned, the ~*sassy*~ juxtaposition of two different styles or eras of furniture is now old news to those of us who have been "decornographers" and/or decorno enthusiasts for awhile. I agree with another commenter; perhaps the pendulum will swing in the opposite direction and we'll all start buying matchy-matchy eight-piece furniture sets. Perfection will be the new eccentric. You heard it here first.

Valerie said...

Last year Domino was like a running gag. You know, those sections where they pick something "Equestrian Chic!" "Trellis Patterns!" and have a little product showcase?

Invariably it would be something that I had bought six months ago. They were channeling my inner lover of zebra print. Bizarre.

I do like Domino. What other magazine can turn the Royal Tenenbaums into a decorating project?

But I live in suburbia, so a little eccentricity goes a long way anyhow.

Anonymous said...

Domino is fine, but like the AARP magazine or Highlights for Children or Seventeen, it's for people of a certain age, and at a certain stage of life. If you're not in that stage, you're going to find it narrow and repetititive.

(And Tom Felicia will always be a douchebag.)

Anonymous said...

I look at home decor magazines only to open my eyes to what's new and different, not to set my style for me. I have no interest in following trendy fashion, and I choose my clothing and my decor by what I like and am comfortable with, and do not set much store by anyone else's opinion. Let's face the truth here, the purpose of magazines is really to sell advertising and get us to buy something. They change the styles constantly to make us buy the new styles and line the pockets of designers....

Anonymous said...

I do what I am told.

Matt J. said...

My biggest pet peeve is the marketing of the term "individual style" or "personal style" when it is peddling a line of products with a very particular aesthetic. (Has anyone seen the latest West Elm catalog? 2nd page - "Personal Design is about being eclectic" - gee - thanks "Ryan, illustrator"). As if patterned sheets would really define someone as "individual". As if any product really would.

Anonymous said...

West Elm is the least personal store I've ever been in.

Anonymous said...

Thom Felicia is a designer for all mankind. Look at what he does for the girls on FMN. Those girls are living like pigs. He cleans them up. Same on Queer Eye for the Straight Guys -- nobody's ever sent home or auffed or gets their feelings hurt. He cleans them up, and gives them a beautiful new start. Jon Lovitz/Douchebag - I think not.

tracy said...

i can't believe how nasty most of the people that comment on this blog are, you sound like a stuck records, i can't believe you are still reading domino, move on already.

Anonymous said...

Tracy is so much more advanced than the rest of us.

Anonymous said...

Makeover shows are inherently hostile, even if the hostility is buried beneath lots of charitable packaging. It's all about the makeover-giver displaying superior judgment, denigrating his subjects ("Those girls are living like/looking like pigs," etc.), and indulging in rescue fantasies. "Look at how bad you had it before *I* came along" is the constant theme.

decorno said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
decorno said...

Wow. So, so true!

Now that you have me thinking of them like that, I totally want to watch them like it's 2001 all over again.

alis said...

I have to agree with anon 8:27.
I haven't seen the new show but the straight guys on queer eye were usually disgusting in the beginning(remember some extreme cases), and the way the queers motivated them really turned their life around for good. Individuality in decor is a good thing, but not everyone is able to express themselves via their decor. Ppl need a little push, there's no harm in those who CAN decorate passing on their knowledge & tips to those who cannot.

Anonymous said...

I remember trying to figure out the "expertise" of that little one, who had a name like "Jai" or something. He would usually say something to the straight guy like "Try to be a better listener!" or some such. I think he weighed about 70 lbs.

Anonymous said...

Oh alis, that is so sweet. But the real agenda of "Queer Eye" was: We're five gay dudes getting revenge on straight men, who tormented us in high school and who grew up to hold most of the power in the world.

(PS: I'm queer.)

Anonymous said...

the obsession with domino...sounds like someone is doing a fine job.

franki durbin said...

So horribly true. I remember (not so long ago) when Z Gallerie infused homes were considered original - or at least stylish and thoughtful.

For me, it all goes back to the Friends/Pottery Barn episode. You'd better have ought that apothecary table while visiting an ailing aunt in France... or you'll be the laughing stock of the neighborhood. ;)