Monday, August 4, 2008

Sometimes you have to go all the way.


So much ivy.
So good.



HERE

24 comments:

The Lil Bee said...

I would love a house like this.

Anonymous said...

Ahhhhh......so good, yes!! Why why are we so taken with these shapes, this green? I can't get enough of it in my own yard....but its boxwood and ivy. Ginny

Anonymous said...

All houses look better in ivy.

katiedid said...

Yes...Burnham is good!

s. said...

Ivy is gorgeous, but I think that most varieties are bad for the actual house, non? I was instructed by my contractor to pull down all of mine because it would damage the bricks & mortar and cause all sorts of heartache...

maison21 said...

i am lucky enough to drive by betsy's home virtually every day. it is lovely- a stand out- in a neighborhood of lovelies...

and i'm even luckier to have rcvd a brief tour of her home when she purchased some lighting from me several years ago- it is a truly stunning house! she is very, very talented (and quite charming, too).

alis said...

looks great, but i can't imagine the bug problem.

pve design said...

Now that's what I call "Ivy League."
I think Ivy makes one look bookish.

a home far away said...

That is an impressing house:-

Have a great week

/Gunilla in Singapore

Anonymous said...

Best experienced through a picture

A maintenance nightmare

paola said...

....so much damage to the underlying wall...

...love Maegan said...

love it. LOVE IT.

I always wonder though, are there more bugs with all the ivy?

Sacheverelle said...

I was told as long as Boston & English ivies are trimmed & cut back they will not damage an otherwise sturdy brick structure. The ivy in this pic def. looks as if it's maintained. This summer I planted a tight row of English Ivy plants at the base of my eyesore of a detached cinder block garage. Can't wait until it's completely engulfed in vining leaf but it's been pretty slow growing. Hoping the one wall be at least partially covered by next summer. Bugs don't seem to gravitate toward it much as far as I've noticed.

Anonymous said...

I so love the look of the ivy too, yet I had been warned of the serious damage it causes whether it's growing onto wood shingles, brick or stucco.

Maybe those that have this gorgeous ivy have beaucoup bucks to repair the damage it causes, so it's worth the look to them?

Anonymous said...

that's not ivy, it's creeping fig. it's all over los angeles.

Anonymous said...

Damage? Maybe...but what about all those really old, stately, ivy covered buildings? They're still standing!

Anonymous said...

Oh NO! The jewel gets lost in that overgrown green "bush". Bring on the ivy Nair. Time to do some trimming.

Anonymous said...

Edward Scissorhands lives there.

Joanna Goddard said...

that's stunning!

Anonymous said...

I love that look! there is a new yoga studio by my apartment that has this awesome modern version of that where it's covered by a ton of plants. I think it was made to withstand the decay and damage that you plants can cause. Its really stunning because its in the middle of Manhattan amongst all the concrete. I'll have to take a picture and post it soon. My boyfriend and I would love to build a house where at least back has the same effect. I mean why not, more earth friendly than painting every few years.

Kwana said...

Oh yes!

Anonymous said...

I've read that English Ivy is much less destructive than Boston Ivy. The thing to avoid is rooting climbers that attach and embed in the mortar and brick and break it apart, can cause tens of thousands of dollars to repair(I'm saving). I think it's probably not a huge issue with stone houses though.

Anonymous said...

Decorno!

How much more can we say about ivy! Post something else before we go mad!

I *Heart* You said...

very pretty! but, are those christmas trees?