Monday, September 1, 2008

Your poverty-stricken ass looks good in those jeans.





Vogue India’s August issue presented a 16-page vision of supple handbags, bejeweled clutches and status-symbol umbrellas, modeled not by runway stars or the wealthiest fraction of Indian society who can actually afford these accessories, but by average Indian people.

Vogue India editor Priya Tanna’s message to critics of the August shoot: “Lighten up,” she said in a telephone interview. Vogue is about realizing the “power of fashion” she said, and the shoot was saying that “fashion is no longer a rich man’s privilege. Anyone can carry it off and make it look beautiful,” she said.


From nytimes.com

29 comments:

drwende said...

No doubt someone will be happy to explain how a $10,000 handbag is "no longer a rich man's privilege."

Decorina said...

Say WHAT? Love, love, love your headline, Decorno.

Anonymous said...

I know I should be all outraged and shit, but god, they are so much better-looking than us. They really are the ones who should be models.

Yes, I am that superficial.

hello gorgeous said...

Vogue has finally run out of models thin enough...

Anonymous said...

WTF?

Victoria Thorne said...

This one needs to be flossed by the American public.

Keep up the good work.

Also: laughed all day yesterday over your venti-sized wit in the ...no carbs blog

...love Maegan said...

no longer a rich man's privilege? wtf? beautiful though ...but very strange.

Anonymous said...

Yes

I can tell that philosophy is really working for the child in pigtales who's joyful expression says "Hey I'm about to keel over any second"

The kid looks like she hasn't eaten a square meal since 2004.

Yes Vogue redeems the starving people with "Fashion"

right.

anon

eM said...

i am so disgusted i can't think of anything snarky to say

Anonymous said...

Oh Vogue, what a great job exploiting impoverished men, women and children to springboard your agenda that materialism is of the utmost importance in our society.

Unbelievable.

Anonymous said...

"Hello Gorgeous"--

You have to start a blog. You're very funny.

Jules said...

I wonder what they paid them, if anything.

Anonymous said...

I hope American Vogue features Appalachians in overalls carrying status bags in an upcoming issue. It is truly tasteless.

Anonymous said...

Those kids made the clothes, shouldn't they at least get to wear them.

Teal Chic said...

Who honestly needs a $100 bib???? Rich or poor, kids are going to get it filthy no matter what!
Love the headline!!!

jen said...

That is one of the most fucked up things I've seen, EVER.

No snark. Just amazement. NICE.

Anonymous said...

Remember that Benetton campaign, with ads that had profiles of death-row inmates?

alis said...

"Starving models", literally..
You're too funny hello gorgeous..!
$100 bib is so stupid. And it's not even cute.

Laura @ the shorehouse. said...

!?!?!?!? I can't believe this is even real. I want to puke.

Anonymous said...

vogue had the power to turn a photospread on those in extreme poverty into a call for aid but didn't. very disappointing.

Anonymous said...

Right, because those controlling the foreign-aid budget in the U.S. usually take their cues from Vogue.

Anonymous said...

Anyone who would buy one of those handbags after this campaign will most definitely be going straight to hell.

Anonymous said...

People buying $2000 handbags might be going to hell anyway.

Anonymous said...

WOW! I'm speachless...unless Vogue donated a nice chucnk of change to those people...I am completely and utterly repulsed. I can't believe there hasn't been more a firestorm over this...

Christine in DC said...

So wrong on so many levels.

hello gorgeous said...

Anon 2:11 pm: You asked for it. Just don't expect too much.

(I don't actually know how you will see this so long after your post, but whatevs, as the kids say)

Anonymous said...

Good start, HG.

You better not quit commenting here though.

Anonymous said...

I see it as Vogue making fun of itself, of fashion. It is just highlighting how in the reality of the real world, how disgusting is it to know that someone out there has actually purchased a $100 dollar bib? In this context, it makes "fashion" seem shameful and ridiculous.

s. said...

I wish Vogue were doing this to make fun of themselves, but if they were showing readers that it's obscene to buy a $1000 bib, they'd lose their advertisers. I'm afraid it's just poor-people-as-backdrop, no irony intended.