Wednesday, November 19, 2008

What should I do for my new kitchen floor?


(Not my kitchen. If only...)

So, we are finally going to start working on it. It's all pretty standard. We're doing marble counters, either subway or some other tile on the backsplash (I am trying to think of how I can sell my better half on those tiles that are stamped to look like snake in a really subtle way... see your most recent issue of Domino).


The floors, well, I love hex tiles. I do. But I am married to the idea mostly because I haven't given much thought to the alternatives.


I definitely do not want bamboo or laminate something or other.


Ideas? Suggestions?


We live in a brick "Tudor"-esque place built in 1929, if that gives you some context.


Oh - and do you have a link to a photo of a favorite kitchen? I would love to see what is out there and what you recommend.


Thanks in advance for the free advice. It's one of the great benefits of my unpaid blogging job.

62 comments:

Elizgonz said...

I hate my brand new tile floors, especially after seeing this house tour on AT. I wish that I had gone with something softer.

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/la/house-tours/house-tour-sharon-and-spencers-danish-dogs-domicile-los-angeles-068998

Anonymous said...

Hi Decorno. There is a great kitchen showroom in Bellevue called Villa Fine Kitchen (it's on main street). They'll show you their (amazing portfolio) and even do a mock-up of your kitchen free of charge (though to get CAD drawings, you have to pay them). I love the floor of their showroom - simple and probably easier to keep clean than hex tiles. You can check it out here but I encourage you to visit them (they did our kitchen cabinets). There's another great kitchen place right down the street called Refined Woodworks - it's also a great place just to get ideas. Good luck! http://www.villafinecabinetry.com/showroom.html

victoria thorne design said...

O! brilliant one:

We went with a light oak floor in Jane's kitchen (see round marble table & adorable blonde boys)...not what I'd expected to use, but it worked out beautifully...the trick was to use a water-based stain, first, so that it didn't edge/age into that icky-orangey look. So much of the floor depends on what the rest of the house/the floors are...it all has to be integral, I believe; that's what makes any room a joy to be in (which is, for God's sake, what we want from a kitchen). And thanks for the whitening advice. What an amazing relief!

Also, Jane's kitchen has Ann Sacks tiles that are subway with at twist...I think something in that family might be just what you're dreaming of? Let me know what else you might be thinking...like I said, I owe you.

Ann said...

I really love stained concrete floors. But, I don't have a picture.

An Aesthete's Lament said...

What about white paint? With lots of layers of protective spar varnish. The only problem is wear but I've always had painted kitchen floors and have been quite fond of them.

i'm Carrie, lovely to meet you… said...

I'm in love with this kitchen...the floors are amazing:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/
url_of_leah/2665767273/

David said...

Marble and subway tile sounds pretty classic. How about a hardwood (in the shade of your choice) laid in a herringbone pattern?

caroline said...

please just continue with your hardwood floors into the kitchen. tiles are SO SO cold and hard on your feet. the little hex ones remind me too much of a bathroom. i say extend the wood floors into your kitchen and paint a border or a pattern on the floor. that would be beautiful, daring and unexpected!

Elizabeth said...

I really like tile and hope that the story told to me by the grandkids of the original owners of our home is true. Hexagonal tile under the kitchen linoleum!? We havn't peeked yet but I'm anxious to do so. I love the kitchen featured in this slide show, including the tile. http://www.housebeautiful.com/decorating/neutrals-are-shimmering-0907

susieq said...

How about limestone or slate floors? Or concrete to mimic stone?

My two favorite kitchens -- one for a client, the other for herself -- were designed by Kay Douglass:

http://www.housebeautiful.com/decorating/it-must-be-belgium-1007?click=main_sr. Click thru the slide show to #5 + #6.

http://eyespy.squarespace.com/archive/2008/11/20/kitchen-lust.html

Tears my heart out to look at them because my own kitchen is such a late 1980s beast.

Mimi's Poor Blog said...

It is such a tough decision... in my case my floors are fine... Saltilo tiles... but I recently had my kitchen sink counter redone... I couldn't afford my dream so I went with subway tiles and I'm sooo happy

Anonymous said...

Regarding carrera marble countertops - they are beautiful but they do show wear and tear even if they are sealed. We got ours from Cacallori in Seattle and I love them, but you have to put up with staining and etching. If you are at all anal-retentive, they could drive you crazy. I love our countertops and wouldn't change them, but ours do show signs of wear and we've had them for about a year. I'd be happy to show them to you (I live in Madrona) if you want to see what marble looks like after a years' worth of cooking. Good luck with your remodel - so exciting!

Jules said...

Following my exodus from the legal profession, I had to rethink a viable flooring for our kitchen remodel. Original pocket doors meant the floor had to have a very low profile. We went with VCT in a modified checkerboard pattern. It cost us next to nothing, and next to the soapstone counters (purchased pre-exodus) it's one of the thing people compliment us on the most. If I had to do it all over again, even with an unlimited budget, I would choose VCT again.

(In other homes I've had custom tiles and hardwood.)

ita darling. said...

i love hex tiles too! 'cept maybe instead of the traditional 1" small ones, you use a matte black 2" with a charcoal grout.

still graphic, and they can be found very inexpensively, more modern and in keeping with the history of your house.

rustic wood floors are lovely, but not apropos to a 1929 tudor style.

the point is to add modernity while respecting your home's heritage.

everyone's examples are exactly different examples of a similar concept- modernizing with a vintage twist...

for more money, you can find marble hex tiles. or tumbled marble hex tiles.

picture 19 of that apartment therapy slide show referenced above has a bathroom with 2" hexs.

daltile makes a variety of hexs in colors and a faux stone looking thing..

if you look around hard enough, there are even 3" and 4" hex tiles around... playing with scale is also a great way to challenge perceptions of a vintage motif... look at all the oversized "industrial" lightfixtures that now look fresh and new again.

design darling said...

Marble counters, subway tiles...you are about to create my dream kitchen. You bitch. And I mean that in the best possible way.

Like you I dig the hex/penny tiles, but as someone already pointed out they can be chilly and hard (which I definitely don't need when trying to make my morning coffee). My boyfriend and I have a 1923 craftsman bungalow with wood floors throughout (including our kitchen) which I like. It hides the dirt well and is warmer than tiles would be. However, if I were going to put tiles down these would be on my top 3...
http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f105/kristinaschubert/tiles.jpg

Loretta said...

How about a nice glass of carmenere while you decide?

tracey said...

Okay now you have piqued my interest, how do I find your open letter to Domino or any of your more contentious posts? They are certainly the most interesting (especially the comments)! Keep up the good work!

Anonymous said...

painted diamond pattern in pale grey and white...just did it in an entrance hall...UNbelievable.

erika said...

hi decorno-
hardwoods for sure! either stained or painted. it'll soften the feel of your kitchen! if you paint them you can pick a cheaper grade of wood... but I dont know what you have going on in adjacent rooms?
Erika

alis said...

Decorno, I don't know what they're called in English but if you go here you'll get an idea of what I mean:

http://www.karoistanbul.com/

Click on "uygulamalar" and "karolar" to see the tiles.

joanie said...

Wood, some type of wood. White heart pine is beautiful so is french pine. We used reclaimed pine from a barn. You can keep it natural or stain. We brushed paint on then wiped it off looks pretty cool.

katek said...

Echoing a few others, spare your feet and go with something softer than tile. Wood or cork...

Anonymous said...

I love cork flooring in kitchens....cushy and warm under foot, doesn't break or chip like tile, doesn't damage or scratch like hardwood, and is "green" if you're into that kind of thing and it is different. I'm so sick of hardwood and tile everywhere....oh yeah, and granite counters - EVERYONE has them!

Can't wait to hear what you decide and see pics!

An Aesthete's Lament said...

I like David's suggestion of herringbone-laid wood. Perhaps very, very pale wood?

Ivy Lane said...

If you do a hard wood, make sure it is a really hard wood! I have brazilian cherry floors and they are SOFT! everytime i drop something, it dents the floor! I think with your marble and subway tile, and if the cabs are white, do a dark hardwood...wider plank.. i think herringbone pattern would be just a little busy with the tile and the veining in the marble though it is a really neat way to lay wood or tile floors. What a fun project. Hope it turns out just the way you dreamed it would!

mudrick said...

I like wood floors, too but kitchen work can be rough on them. Slate is nice. Windsor Smith did alternating squares of marble and grey ceramic in her Domino spread which looked great and softer than the stark black and white checkerboard squares you sometimes see. I have a slew of kitchen images that are in the painted cabinet/marble counter genre on my flickr account. My "handle" is mudrick. Here's the link: http://www.flickr.com/photos/91217466@N00/sets/72157602247356570/

Anonymous said...

Your kitchen will be fabulous. Good for you to be willing to spend and consume. Apparently you feel secure in your employment situation. Do you care to comment on the depression, oops, I mean "recession"?

Anonymous said...

Step away from the tile! It is cold, uncomfortable to stand on for long periods of time, and if you drop something on it it will break. I would either keep your wood or put in cork (there are some beautiful bleached ones out there)--it is soft, warm, eco-friendly, and comfortable to stand on for long periods.

Decorno said...

So many good suggestions - thanks everyone.

Anon from Madrona - yes, I would love to come see your counters, actually. Will you email me? Maybe I can stop by this weekend. I will bring you a cupcake from Cupcake Royale as payment for your time.

Also - other Anon - The 2" hex with the charcoal grout is a great idea, too. Thank you.

Connor said...

First of all, I'm not Connor -- he's my teenage son but I can't seem to sign out of this account.

Five years ago, I had the pleasure of working with an architect and a top kitchen designer to create my dream kitchen. There are a number of comments that I agree with -- Victoria Thorne, who said the floors should flow with the rest of the house. Also, I agreed with the person who said that tile and stone are hard on your feet (and your back).

We laid oak floors which were stained as dark as possible -- this was consistent with the floors throughout the house and looked beautiful with the white cabinetry and stainless in the kitchen.

One thing that drives me nuts about many kitchens is the use of tile as a backsplash behind the cooktop. I cook -- I mean, I really cook. My kitchen was not created to be a showcase. I wanted stainless steel on the cooktop/range wall. When the kitchen designer showed me her first sketch of the wall with a tile backsplash, I asked her if she was going to come over and clean the grout with a tooth brush. I did use tile on the wall with the dishwasher and sink -- I just didn't want it on the wall where my range was.

Also -- one last suggestion: If you have an island -- I would recommend making the surface material thicker than the countertops -- 3".

For anyone with a passion for design - being able to renovate a kitchen is a great experience -- definitely stressful -- but you'll learn a lot. Enjoy it! I no longer live in the house with my "dream" kitchen, but I have a great memories of the experience of creating it.

Decorno said...

Anon 6:50 am.

We are a two income family that saves one income. We buy used cars and they are paid off. We have no credit card debt. We pay cash for everything and we do not live wildly. I have saved nearly all my stock from my company for 6 years to make sure that I had money saved for a rainy day.

We have lived with a shithole kitchen for 3 years because we wanted to save a nest egg just to have some security, and then we wanted to save cash to pay for the kitchen.

I thank you for saying "good for you to be willing to spend and consume." Thank you, yes. We saved so we could do this when the time was right. The economy may be bad for some, but personally, we are fine. So far.

Re: "Do you care to comment on the depression, oops, recession," I know it's hard for a lot of people out there, and I feel for them. I do know that the contractor we are hiring is starting our work right away, which means he needs the work, and we are happy we can give the job to him.

Other than that, all I can say is that people who get back into the market carefully in the next 1 - 2 years and stay in for about 7 are probably going to make a shit ton of money. I hope I am one of them.

kelleyp said...

my kitchen looks very similar to what you want in a kitchen--white cabinets, light grey island, black honed granite on outer, carrera marble on island, and white subways on walls. so we did dark brown, hand scraped wood floors. i love them. have hex tiles in girls bathroom and seriously got dirty in 1 months time. would not go for a tile with loads of grout--even the sealant won't keep it clean for long. however, large tile slabs of travertine might be nice.

lucitebox said...

Decorno--good for you, you smart money manager! You know, I'd do hardwood. Really, really hard hardwood! It is beautiful, easy to stand on, and it ages well if you get the right wood and take care of it.

If I could interject, please? Jules--you might be able to solve my dilemma. What is VCT? I need a new kitchen floor, too. I have a landlord who will pay for it, but I need floors that are durable and don't look as if a landlord with bad taste picked them out. I am sticking with the linoleum crap I have in there now until I find the right thing.

Oh...I drop stuff in the kitchen, cook a LOT, and I have dogs so I need something that is very durable, but I know landlord won't do hardwood. I suspect I'm looking at a $300 budget for 140 square feet.

Decorno--I am so glad to see this post!

Anonymous said...

I think these are beautiful marble hex-tile floors that Anna put in her bathroom:

http://www.doorsixteen.com/2008/09/05/windows-and-doors/

They're perfectly clean and have a touch of sparkle which would be gorgeous in a white kitchen.

CSS said...

This is my white kitchen with orange accents:(http://www.psbphoto.com/published_architectural_photographer.html)and I love it....I have a travertine floor with radiant heating underneath - I disagree that it is hard on your feet/back, I have never had a problem and I am always in the kitchen! We also have honed absolute black granite countertops and couldn't be happier. I do think most granite is overdone, but honed black is different - looks like slate, but better priced! Good luck, can't wait to see the result!

meredith said...

glad to see your financially responsible lifestyle is paying off! i am also hoping to remodel our 1911 kitchen in the next few years, so i have accumulated a bunch of images on flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dityfleur/sets/72157606446126249/

i recently used penny round tiles in our bathroom, which i would consider using in our kitchen (in black maybe?), except that we have a fir floor under all that crappy vinyl. if the fir doesn't look like it is salvageable, i will would consider the penny rounds, linoleum or cork.

good luck with your project!

CSS said...

I forgot to mention that we used
3" framed mirror as our backsplash and all our cabinets are backed with mirror and it really adds depth to the room. Not too expensive either, and I am thrilled with the results.

Anonymous said...

Yes, we have this little economic sub-text going here--if that is okay with you. The reason I mention this is because I am really wanting to change out my kitchen countertops, backsplash and that will mean a new sink, too.

We are also a two income family that saves one income. We also buy used cars (my husband drives a 1991 Nissan, and I drive a 1998 van); we have no credit card debt. We're big savers. Until the crashing of the markets, we had a nest egg worth nearly $1 million. Now, I'm sure it is half that. Probably even less and seemingly less by the hour. I'm afraid to look. You were quite fortunate with your company stock. Us: not so much. We scrimped and saved and went without and deferred gratification only to see much of it evaporate before our very eyes. (And these were not risky investments; just talking garden variety 401ks here, vanguard, tiaa-creff, etc.)

Maybe if I had put my money in the mattress, I'd now have it for my kitchen remodel.

Ryan said...

Lucitebox - VCT stands for Vinyl Composition Tile. Basically it's the stuff you see on the floor in a grocery store or other industrial applications. However if installed properly it looks not-industrial and is inexpensive and durable (although it does require periodic waxing to look its best). Look at the kitchen referenced in the first post (AT house tour). They have an all black VCT floor.

I have it in my kitchen and installed it myself

ita darling. said...

to the lovely individual who left the link to Karo Istanbul tiles- THANK YOU! i just got back from Paris and in every Bistro there are similar looking patterned tiles- I LOVE the look, especially the examples mixed with modern furniture. I don't know what you call it in English either except for GORGEOUS.

Vivien said...

Kelleyp nailed it. My favorite kitchens are light on the top and dark on the bottom. White cabinets with dark wood floors. If you have wood floors in the adjoining rooms, without a doubt, I would continue the look into the kitchen.

Tomorrow can we talk about kitchen hardware? Sinks and faucets? Single sink? Double sink? Undermount? Stainless? Stone? All the faucet choices these days make me wet (pun intended). I want a new kitchen, bul I will have to settle for a new sink and faucet.

Julia said...

Earlier this year my husband and I redid the floors in my kitchen and high traffic areas for the second time in two years. The first time around I was foolish enough to do laminate and it started falling apart. Crushed and sad, we ripped it up and decided to put down Teregren. I considered wood, tile, concrete, cork, everything and this was my final choice and I have to say I'm THRILLED with it. We choose the Synergy Java color which is woven from several different colors which gives it a very warm and unique look. It's really absolutely beautiful.

And if it's beauty isn't enough, the company that makes it owns their own land in China and pays fair wages to their factory workers there too (I really did my homework when I was shopping this time around!). They are also incredibly evironmentally conscious and a local company (out of Bainbridge Island).

Oh and get this -- a few weeks ago we had our house painted and in one section the painters managed to spray a bunch of oil paint on my floor. I thought they were ruined but in my completely amazement, with nothing more than a damp rag, the paint just rolled off! I still cannot believe it.

I don't work for this company, I just absolutely love my floors and I think you will too.

CSS said...

Vinyl is terrible for the environment, just awful!

Anonymous said...

I've done two kitchens (very high end) and was sadly disappointed with the wood in the last one. It's so porous compared to sealed tile...dirty. dirty. dirty. The bottoms of my feet were always dirty and I cleaned them a lot.

Holly @ Maison James said...

You cannot go wrong with hardwood. I don't think it would be bad at all for a Tudor. It's warm and lucsious. Paint it if you want or even better, distress it to make it look like reclaimed stuff.

I love mine and it's sooo comfortable to stand and work on. Another altnerative is Brick - yes, Regular brick. Surprisingly warm and beautiful and not bad underfoot as you'd think.

saraem said...

Don't do slate! Our house is basically slate and hardwood. It took weeks after we'd moved in to figure out why our legs ached every Monday morning. Too much slate walking over the weekend!! Plus it's cold, and I never can keep the grout looking as clean as I would like.

corine said...

I'm crazy about large black and white checker boards. That's for style. In reality, white in a kitchen will make you (it made me) miserable. Now I have 8 inch wide planks of antiqued american walnut. It's warm under foot and a cinch to clean, as long as it's been properly finished.

Anonymous said...

I am surprised nobody has mentioned Marmoleum- looks great, is kind to lower backs, is easy to maintain and is kind to the environment. We went with a mid-tone grey with a stoney look.

Anonymous said...

Off subject but I'm devastated about the Cottage Living news and no one is writing about it in the blog world...

http://www.nypost.com/seven/11182008/business/time_inc__closing_cottage_living_magazin_139387.htm

lucitebox said...

Thanks, Ryan~I have some samples of the Amstrong brand of VCT tiles of which you speak. I'm going to have to install it myself if doing it right is the key because my fabulous landlord (who really is nice, but has bad taste) just doesn't hire good workers.

Marmoleum is cool! I'd agree, but I don't think it's appropriate for Decornor's tudor.

Stone sounds good, but I still think that a Tudor would be right with wood. Hex tiles? They're really beautiful, but I can't imagine dealing with cleaning a lot of square footage that's hex tile. I once rented a place with a large bathroom of hex tile. I loved how it looked, but I hated cleaning it.

Anonymous said...

I LOVE my vinyl floor.

Yeah, vinyl.

I got Amtico, which makes the good stuff, from what I've been told. (Even Tommi Parzinger endorsed a line of vinyl flooring--I think Armstrong or Amtico.)

I'm clutzy and always dropping things, and stuff does not break on vinyl. And it's more comfortable to stand on than ceramic or stone. Easier on your back and legs.

Also, you can clean it with Glass Plus in about three seconds.

pve design said...

slate- baby!

melissa said...

My vote wouldn't be tile for the same reasons others have mentioned - its so cold and hard on your feet & back if you are cooking (not that I actually cook for extended hours). I always love it when the hardwood extends through into the kitchen. cork - especially the ones with the white stain on them so there not so hippy-ish (scroll down to the Earth Marbella color: http://www.naturalcork.com/cork_styles.php). And if you really want to go with stone - there is a beautiful limestone called Lagos Blue or Lagos Azul that is grayish in color and really subtle.

As for pics, here some great inspiration photos along the lines of the one you have here:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_e_MQyZR1E6U/SP-7DeLEE8I/AAAAAAAAUKY/CByTDEmp-iU/s1600-h/13.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_yqsQcxWk4iw/SMXZqdTqUjI/AAAAAAAACaQ/Q7m45H8_eNA/s1600-h/Picture+30.jpg

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_yqsQcxWk4iw/SMXaAoRzyiI/AAAAAAAACao/0BX1xFzpgM4/s1600-h/Picture+33.jpg

http://bp3.blogger.com/_e_MQyZR1E6U/R-7nFFfn4iI/AAAAAAAANOI/IASqbz8EGWs/s1600-h/gvinteriors2.jpg

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_e_MQyZR1E6U/SOFtknTPEuI/AAAAAAAATl8/R1k98i4lDUo/s1600-h/3.jpg

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/chicago/country-house/modern-lake-house-by-murdoch-young-architects-057355

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_bfiAdEt8Jq8/SNCPC00Mh8I/AAAAAAAABEo/PSPNEA0V8UE/s1600-h/9.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_70Inj1ZGMvE/SK2P9WEuH4I/AAAAAAAAC7g/pPZ7W-nCZIw/s1600-h/Kitchen-island-backsplash-MKOVR0705-de.jpg

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_e_MQyZR1E6U/SJ-QC2RtCaI/AAAAAAAAR6g/qHzNXTQoK9A/s1600-h/13.jpg

melissa said...

My vote wouldn't be tile for the same reasons others have mentioned - its so cold and hard on your feet & back if you are cooking (not that I actually cook for extended hours). I always love it when the hardwood extends through into the kitchen. cork - especially the ones with the white stain on them so there not so hippy-ish (scroll down to the Earth Marbella color: http://www.naturalcork.com/cork_styles.php). And if you really want to go with stone - there is a beautiful limestone called Lagos Blue or Lagos Azul that is grayish in color and really subtle.

As for pics, here some great inspiration photos along the lines of the one you have here:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_e_MQyZR1E6U/SP-7DeLEE8I/AAAAAAAAUKY/CByTDEmp-iU/s1600-h/13.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_yqsQcxWk4iw/SMXZqdTqUjI/AAAAAAAACaQ/Q7m45H8_eNA/s1600-h/Picture+30.jpg

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_yqsQcxWk4iw/SMXaAoRzyiI/AAAAAAAACao/0BX1xFzpgM4/s1600-h/Picture+33.jpg

http://bp3.blogger.com/_e_MQyZR1E6U/R-7nFFfn4iI/AAAAAAAANOI/IASqbz8EGWs/s1600-h/gvinteriors2.jpg

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_e_MQyZR1E6U/SOFtknTPEuI/AAAAAAAATl8/R1k98i4lDUo/s1600-h/3.jpg

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/chicago/country-house/modern-lake-house-by-murdoch-young-architects-057355

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_bfiAdEt8Jq8/SNCPC00Mh8I/AAAAAAAABEo/PSPNEA0V8UE/s1600-h/9.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_70Inj1ZGMvE/SK2P9WEuH4I/AAAAAAAAC7g/pPZ7W-nCZIw/s1600-h/Kitchen-island-backsplash-MKOVR0705-de.jpg

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_e_MQyZR1E6U/SJ-QC2RtCaI/AAAAAAAAR6g/qHzNXTQoK9A/s1600-h/13.jpg

Anonymous said...

Have you looked at anything from Popham like this:

http://www.pophamdesign.com/layouts2.php?id=19&til=56&lay=56

Pretty badass.

Corey said...

A slate, or ceramic slate lookalike would look good. For the slate I recommend an all black slate.

There are pics of real slate on my blog in the bathroom, and the kitchen is a slate lookalike.

Jennifer said...

you totally may have seen this, but Erika at Urban Grace is a kitchen genius and has been installing basic white subway tile in a herrigbone pattern and I think it looks awesome. classic but still interesting, and I bet no one else on your block has it!

here: http://urbangraceinteriors.typepad.com/.a/6a00e54ef51a888833010535d60788970c-popup

and here: http://urbangraceinteriors.typepad.com/.a/6a00e54ef51a888833010535f68eca970b-popup

Dorothy said...

I decorate my new kitchen with wonderful furniture, appliances and other decorative stuff which got from WalMart...

Mrs. Limestone said...

Im a wood fan..especially with the stone and tile you're using. But hex or basketweave is awesome as well.

If you want something more modern, a monotone gray slate would look good too.

Koekkener said...

Great blog article. Look great! Thank you for sharing...

CASE said...

You should definitely do concrete flooring. Maybe some concrete stamping. I just did this to my kitchen floor and it looks amazing. It it less expensive than stone or slate and it can resemble whatever your heart desires. I used Spragues' Ready Mix Concrete. www.srmconcrete.com

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