Saturday, December 6, 2008

Glammed-up kitchen.



I remember this photo from Met Home a while back. I remember specifically that this was the issues I decided Met Home might be worth buying again.

Found the photo HERE. What a useful blog for all things kitchen-related.

Hey - can anyone answer this? Our kitchen contractor says that our marble slab will need to be cut and then fitted together. He says the seam will be barely visible. I don't believe this is necessary. I need some info from those of you who have installed marble counters.

16 comments:

Anonymous said...

We went through the same thing. Our counters were installed with a seam, without telling us. We made them take it out, picked a new slab, and had it re-done.

What sometimes necessitates the seam: is it l-shaped? (it needs to be a pretty huge piece to make it down two lengths, our slab had an about an inch to spare); how much it weighs as one piece/how big it is and what they need to navigate to get to the kitchen; a big sink hole, which makes it weak and sometimes causes it to break, etc.

The seam won't be that noticeable, but my husband is a tard and couldn't live with it.

You could ask how big the slab is and then do a rough measure of your space. If it is an l-shaped area, then measure the longest side...

Sara said...

There is usually a seam somewhere in any stone depending on how long the run is...Have you driven around the stone yards? You can see the uncut slabs and they they don't come as long rectangles. The are more like a fat wide rectangle...so if you have a long stretch of counter or L corner they lay the template on your slab twice and try to use most of it in the most economical and congruent way. If you are just doing it on an island you can probably get away without a seam.
Not sure about yours but in the few kitchens I've done they try to do the seam around the sink so that there is just a tiny seam in front and behind...filled...and there is already a large sink cut out so you there isn't one deep seam (just two tiny ones) It's the best way and really not noticeable w/ the faucet/sink.

Jackie Von Tobel said...

Marble and granite are cut in standard slab sizes but they still vary in width and length and if your counter tops are long it may have to be seamed. Seaming is also a way to save money by not wasting material.

You should always ask where the contractor is purchasing your slabs and insist on going there to pick out the exact ones you want him to buy. There can be significant variations from slab to slab.

First, check the suppliers inventory to see if they have any slabs long enough to accommodate your counter top. If you still need to use multiple slabs or cuts look for slabs that are very similar in grain so your seam will not be obvious.

Next work with your contractor to plan the best possible placement of the seam. Avoid seams in the center of work areas or high traffic points.

No matter what you do to avoid it you may still wind up with seams that bother you. Try to get your contractor to set them as tight as you can and use a custom colored grout to fill it in. Use a sealer to finish the seam so it won't pick up dirt.

Hope this helps - good luck!

David said...

In our last place our granite got seamed because it was L shaped. In the current place our island is 12 feet long, so it's seamed at the sink just like Sara said. The contractor always says you won't notice it, but I do. If you can get one solid piece I'd recommend it.

lynne said...

I moved into a house with granite counters in the kitchen, with a seam. I don't know who put in the kitchen, but the seam is totally noticeable, as one side of the granite is approx. 4mm higher than the other side of the seam, and only toward the edge of the counter! It's a great big L shaped counter so it probably had to be done, but you can see how a seam can be a problem.

Anonymous said...

Hey Decorno, Madrona Kitchen here. Who is fabricating your slab? We picked out our slab at Pental's in Georgetown and had Cacallori cut & fabricate the countertop. They did a great job - we don't have any seams and we have a "L" shaped piece. I'd push back on your contractor about this issue and ask him to explain exactly why a seam is necessary. Good luck!!!on't think we have any

Anonymous said...

We have a lot of counter/island top space.
Our seams are cut in long graceful swerves - sort of around the marble swirls as not to visibly break the patters.
Invisible really - only I know it's there.
If you seam, this is the way to do it.
WI fan

woodley park-zoo said...

Sorry no input for you on the marble, but I do find that I'm drawn to Met Home myself, in spite of my no-budget, non ownership state. I like to read about the renovations that people are doing. Even if the families featured are in a different life stage than me I enjoy peeking into their thinking process, hoping I'll get to consider those points in the future.

Anonymous said...

My island is calcutta extra (love it) and it is 5 x 4 with no seam. We have one seam in the whole kitchen! it does not bother me.

Rebecca said...

Sometimes the seam can work for you. If you have a lot of movement in your marble, and you can work with it at a mitered corner I think it’s beautiful.

Recently I did a honey onyx counter in a bar, it was L shaped and the seam looked divine with the movement moving from one piece to the other.

To sum it up, you need a good relationship with your fabricator. You want to see exactly what part of your stone will be used where you want it. If you can’t find a piece that is long enough, keep looking. Good Luck.

Ps. My firm landed the cover of Trad Home this month, Great Expectations, page 71 check it out

Decorina said...

Ah, Madrona Kitchen is right. Push back, in the nicest possible way of course, and ask how a seam can be avoided. Your early sketch didn't show an "L" shaped counter anywhere...so it can most likely be avoided.

...love Maegan said...

i want this kitchen. NOW.

CSS said...

We have a seam right at the sink and it bothered me a bit at first, but I have a really long counter. If you have a deep sink the seam won't be long. I put my dish soap on it and I don't notice it (well, I did this morning after reading the post). I think if you are using a honed material vs. polished you may notice it more with the polished. I also got a really good price on my stone, so I didn't care about the seam, as I wanted to put my money elsewhere.

Anonymous said...

Warning MITR (man in the room). One aspect to be very careful about with seaming marble is that the veining in stone can make for some very undesirable patterns when the stone is "book matched". Back in the seventies there was and still is an installation mable slabs at the Krannert Center at theUniversity of Illinois. The effect was a bit too close to looking like anatomy shots (buttocks or vaginas).

hallie said...

In every fancy kitchen I have ever seen there was a seam, and I have been in some crazy fancy ones on Park Ave and the like. The L shaped thing is unavoidable as everyone says, but the main place i see them is in the center of the sink, so there's a tiny seam in front and a tiny seam in back. If they do it well you have to look for it.
I only wanted to mention this because I think it's wrong to think its a sign of subpar or less than perfect craftmanship.
I have been told it is because the stone cannot support its own weight when it gets thin like that.

Web Designer said...

what a beautiful kitchen, I love it.