Thursday, July 2, 2009

Second home.



Timely article since we were just talking about summer homes a few posts ago...

"Every weekend, starting in October, the couple drove two hours from their home in Brooklyn to the house, undertaking all of the necessary reconstruction themselves, except the re-roofing, which was done by a contractor. Both urbanites, neither had ever tackled a renovation before, but the project was thrilling to them.

HERE.

27 comments:

Elissa said...

Wow, well done. All that and then they had their wedding there? Geez, It takes me that long to do one room in our house.

my favorite and my best said...

awesome article. i love a cheap ass makeover. and she did such a great job in there. however, i could have gone my whole life without the "labor of love" comment. just finished wiping up the puke.

Alison said...

thanks for posting this. i really love that it was both really on a tight budget and not someone's idea of scrimping by only using $400,000 and it acutally turned out beautifully! they did an incredible job.

Nikki said...

I love when people break the mold like that...I wish I had it in me.

Anonymous said...

'Former script co-ordinator' is code for job seeker. Somebody hire him or he'll pull the rest of that hair out and he's too young to get away with the Will Arnett look.

Anyway, that fridge is adorable. I had to go with Big Chill to get that look and my handles don't have the cool hinge; they're fixed.

That living room doesn't have a crawl; it's three season.

Anonymous said...

I don't know what 'streets' she's finding all this stuff on, but it's not the streets in my neighborhood.

Diane Dorrans Saeks said...

Hi-

Lovely post...and there was one important question (no, two) not answered in that NYT story!

One: did the house really cost $95,000. To a Californian that reads like a typo.
Two: they said it was 'going to seed' but seem to have skipped over the first part of the restoration and then went straight to the happy and clean part.
Where was the part of the story that should have read 'for the first 3 months they cleared away 10 Dumpsters of rubbish'.Or, 'the floors were rotten and they had to replace them and then found the house had no foundation'.
They also failed to mention WHERE they went Dumpster diving to find furniture etc.
New York stories always say 'found it on the sidewalk'...as if you just have to walk down the street, any day, and you will find a Louis XVI chair or a Mies chair...hmm, no. It take years, or never.
Lovely pictures--the house looks so fresh and I love the green-painted woodwork. Delicious.

CDS said...

Oh this is a great stairway! Someday I may be grown up enough to have 2 homes.

Decorina said...

I'm with the poster that asked about their expenditure before the decorating took place. I wanted a window in the cabinet under my sink where $700 of plumbing was required.

Other than that - I love the interiors (but please, no one tell them that the window in their living room is seriously out of square with everything else).

Iheartfashion said...

I found this story totally amazing. I can't believe how little they spent!

JoAnn said...

Nice little place.

When someone says they got a "bed" on Craigslist, does that mean a mattress?

If so....EEEEWWWWWW ....A used mattress is GROSS.

birdy said...

Sweet! Love the house. Lots of personality. In fact, it makes me miss Domino . . . it looks like a home they would have featured. And it's a tonic after all of the overdone interiors featured in the the remaining shelter mags these days.

Anonymous said...

i find it laughable that they are so thrifty yet they rent in williamsburg!

Anonymous said...

Anon 10:02 AM

What are you babbling about?

eM said...

i CALL BULLSHIT

Anonymous said...

I love stories like these because they are so laughable. Yes, of course the young lovers did everything themselves -- but that doesn't mean they did it well. And lucky for them they didn't have any major issues to deal with. Almost anyone can spackle and slap paint up. And hook up a stove.

And let me echo the previous comment. In what neighborhood do you have to dumpster dive to find something decent, and how do you fend off the roving hordes of other designers who are trying to score the same cast-off Knoll chairs?

terre said...

i love that. i remember the reno we helped my aunt with when i was in high school. tight budget, family pitching in, contractors for the major stuff. there were hard times (it used to be the local crack den & ho house & the morning i took my SATs i was covered in paint & spackle), but it was a really gratifying.

terre said...

on the dumpster diving comments...you know, it's possible. i lived in SF/Oakland for a long time and the shit i found on the streets was truly amazing. the things i threw out, including (and TOTALLY by accident) a huge box of candles and bath crap from l'occitane, were pretty good too. it just depends. if you live in that kind of city/town, it's possible. so stop hating. it's a lovely summer day.

Anonymous said...

I have found an Eileen Gray chrome side table on the street in Los Angeles so it is possible. At a different location, I found a Le Corbusier chaise lounge in cowhide. Couldn't keep it though, it took up too much space.

Anonymous said...

Although Eileen Gray chrome side tables and Le Corbusier chaise lounges are knocked off at the rate of about 30 times a second, so those aren't shocking finds (even Target is now carrying Le Corbusier pieces).

drwende said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

Amazing story, I love to read about other "trash pickers". I have never found anything valuable but I have found plenty of things that looks great after being cleaned and fixed and painted.

Anonymous said...

I thought that apartment was hideous. Mr. Ortega looked so unhappy. And they idea of depositing your outside clothes in the laundry before you allow yourself to go into your all-white apartment where you don't entertain. Just so sad. Even for decorno types

Cristina said...

I think they're may be an age gap over what "going to seed" means. But good for then on the reno of the place. Craigslist can have some nice stuff.

My question is did she really say that the stove was wood-fired? Did I miss something when she said wood box? God I hope that's a euphamism for impending newlywed booty.

Cristina said...

and Decorno I too, had an Alice in Wonderland moment looking at that window. very bizarre.

Anonymous said...

Well, yes, you do find all kinds of good things as well as junk on the streets of New York City. People just put things out when they don't want them and the stuff is gone in 30 minutes. Years ago, as a downtown kid with an apartment in the East Village (aka the Lower East Side) we found all sorts of great stuff on the streets. Actually I still have a couple of them--a vintage oak table top and a real Hoosier cabinet. I once saw workmen cutting up an old solid oak bar to send it into the dumpster.

Renovation Therapy said...

I love the comfort to style ratio they pulled off on the cheap. Kudos.